Gaelic

Gaelic

Global Language Services Ltd has continually expanded its Gaelic translation service offering and market presence. The majority of our clients have created an unprecedented demand for Gaelic translators working across a variety of fields. We have translated numerous documents into Gaelic including:

  • web phrases
  • course materials and educational resources
  • letters and magazines
  • information leaflets and brochures
  • Gaelic language plans

As a result of this, we have a vast database of active Gaelic translators to choose from. We are confident that, notwithstanding the volume of work, the strength of our existing network of translators, leaves us ideally positioned to deliver a consistently high level of service at a competitive price.

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Examples of customers who have requested Gaelic translations:

  • SQA (Scottish Qualifications Authority) – Your Exams booklet
  • National Galleries of Scotland – Gaelic Language plan
  • AiB (Accountant in Bankruptcy) – Debtor’s Guide
  • Skills Development Scotland – Corporate Strategy, My World of Work, Modern Apprenticeships
  • Care Inspectorate – Unhappy About a Care Service? leaflet
  • Census Scotland – FAQs, explanations, what the Census is, the actual Census itself
  • Scottish Parliament – News releases, blogs, information booklets and leaflets, web material, reports and any other resources required by the Scottish Parliament
  • NHS 24 – Health care information: Health in My Language
  • Police Scotland – Community policing plans for different island and Gaelic-speaking communities
  • Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network – Autism guidelines

Did You Know?

Scottish Gaelic is not an official language of the UK or EU, despite it being potentially older than English and spoken by around 57,000 people in Scotland.

In the middle ages, Scottish and Irish communities were taught Classical Gaelic. Resultantly, Scots language speakers dubbed Scottish Gaelic ‘Erse’ (the Scots word for Irish). The linguistic split between Scottish and Irish Gaelic only occurred after Classical Gaelic stopped being taught in schools.

Help Us Exceed Your Needs

Contact us today by requesting a quote, calling 0141 429 3429, or emailing mail@globallanguageservices.co.uk

For translation, the easiest way to get your file(s) to us is to upload securely to our website here. Alternatively, you can write us an email or simply send the documents to us by fax or post.